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Cortinarius violaceus.   Click a photo to enlarge it.   back to list

synonyms: Cortinaire violet, Dunkelvioletter Dickfuss, Violet Webcap
Cortinarius violaceus Mushroom
Ref No: 7181
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Cortinarius violaceus 4 Mushroom
Ref No: 7183
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Cortinarius violaceus3 Mushroom
Ref No: 7186
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location: North America, Europe
edibility: Poisonous/Suspect
fungus colour: Violet or purple
normal size: 5-15cm
cap type: Convex to shield shaped
stem type: Bulbous base of stem
spore colour: Rusty brown
habitat: Grows in woods, Grows on the ground

Cortinarius (Cortinarius) violaceus (L. ex Fr.) Fr. Dunkelvioletter Dickfuss Cortinaire violet Violet Webcap Cap 3.515cm across, convex, margin incurved, dark violaceous to blue-black, covered in fine downy scales. Stem 60120 x 1020mm (2040mm at base), swollen to bulbous at base, dark blue-violaceous, covered in woolly fibrils. Flesh violaceous, more strongly so below cap cuticle and in stem. Taste mild, smell slight, of cedar wood. Gills dark violet becoming purplish brown. Spore print rust. Spores elliptic to almond-shaped, rough, 1215 x 78.5. Habitat deciduous woods, especially oak, birch and beech, also occasionally with conifers. Season autumn. Rare. Said to be edible, but I advise that you do not eat it as all Cortinarius contain some toxins. Distribution, America and Europe.

Members' images and comments

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Paul Glasser (United States) - 23 September 2013

This specimen was photographed Sept. 14, 2013 in the North Cascades of Washington state, USA, in a forest of western hemlock, douglas fir, and silver spruce.
Cortinarius violaceus 2
PETER ABERSON (United Kingdom) - 16 January 2011

This specimen of the Cortinarius violaceus mushroom was found in the New forest on the 31st of October 2010 under beech trees in mixed woodland.
Cortinarius violaceus 2
PETER ABERSON (United Kingdom) - 16 January 2011

This specimen of the Cortinarius violaceus mushroom was found in the New forest on the 31st of October 2010 under beech trees in mixed woodland. The specimen’s gills are visible.
Cortinarius violaceus 2
PETER ABERSON (United Kingdom) - 16 January 2011

This old specimen of the Cortinarius violaceus mushroom was found in the New forest on the 31st of October 2010 under beech trees in mixed woodland. The specimen’s cap is clearly concave with its gills “rolling” onto the edge of the cap.
Cortinarius violaceus 2
PETER ABERSON (United Kingdom) - 16 January 2011

This old specimen of the Cortinarius violaceus mushroom was found in the New forest on the 31st of October 2010 under beech trees in mixed woodland. This specimen is partly brown due to its age and the cap is concave with its gills “rolling” onto the edge of the cap.
Cortinarius violaceus 2
PETER ABERSON (United Kingdom) - 16 January 2011

This specimen of the Cortinarius violaceus mushroom was found in the New forest on the 16th of October 2010 under beech trees in mixed woodland.
Cortinarius violaceus 2
PETER ABERSON (United Kingdom) - 16 January 2011

This specimen of the Cortinarius violaceus mushroom was found in the New forest on the 16th of October 2010 under beech trees in mixed woodland. The cap and stem of the specimen is partly brown due to its age.
Cortinarius violaceus 2
Krisztina Harasztosi (Canada) - 11 October 2010

Cortinarius violaceus 2
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